Pi DENTAL CENTER BLOG

More Mobile Phones Than Toothbrushes? Fact or Fiction

Posted by Chris Raines on Aug 3, 2016 2:14:28 PM

More Mobile Phones Than Tooth Brushes? Fact or Fiction

Did you ever hear there were more mobile phones than toothbrushes?  We wondered whether this startling statement was actually true. The Mobile Marketing Association of Asia originally reported this data, stating that, ‘out of 6 billion people on the planet, 4.8 billion have a mobile phone while only 4.2 billion own a toothbrush’ Link to article. 

Jamie Turner of 60 2nd Marketer attempted to determine the validity of this statement.  A Google search using the phrase, “number of mobile phones worldwide,” showed that there are 4.6 billion mobile phone subscriptions worldwide. Yet, the true number of phone owners is more complicated than it seems. In some parts of the world, people have more than one subscription. When this variable was considered, the number of mobile phone owners dropped to 4.2 billion. 

Mr. Turner had even more difficulty determining how many people own toothbrushes. Colgate reported having 34 percent of the market share in manual toothbrushes. Oral-B stated the yearly toothbrush market is $5 billion. By calculating the cost of toothbrushes on Amazon, he determined an average cost to be $3.00 in the US, but closer to $1.55 worldwide.

Ultimately, Mr. Turner concluded that approximately 3.22 billion toothbrushes were sold last year. And although it is almost impossible to determine the actual numbers of toothbrushes or mobile phones, the statement that there are more mobile phones than toothbrushes seems to have some validity. 

3.22 BILLION TOOTHBRUSH OWNERS < 4.0 BILLION MOBILE PHONES OWNERS

Regardless of the exact number of toothbrushes or mobile phones, the real issue is the state of people's oral hygiene and dental health. Is oral hygiene protocol satisfactory to maintain good oral health? 

Recently, ABC News broadcasted an Associate Press story claiming that the medical benefits of dental floss are unproven and challenged the dental profession's recommendation to floss daily.

The American Dental Association has affirmed flossing as an essential part of tooth and gum care and has a web page outlining the benefits of flossing along with an instructional video.

Do the doctors and dental hygienists at Pi Dental Center recommend flossing? 

Dr. Glenn Wolfinger, Board Certified Prosthodontist at Pi Dental Center states, "For most dental implant patients, a toothbrush and Waterpik may be the most ideal method for oral hygiene.  For those with natural teeth, brush and flossing is recommended. Flossing not only removes debris between teeth, but if done properly, could provide positive stimulation to the gingival tissues."

Daily oral hygiene home care can include dental floss, oral irrigators, proxabrushesConnie Hartranft, RDH at Pi Dental Center, affirms, “As a Dental Hygienist who has worked in the field for over twenty years, I do find it surprising that there are limited long term studies on the effectiveness of flossing.  It is accepted that brushing reduces the sticky matrix, filled with bacteria known as plaque on teeth and gums when done properly. Brushing, however, cannot reach the areas between the teeth and slightly below the gum line where quite a bit of bacteria accumulates.  After spending countless hours treating patients, I feel that I have the practical knowledge to state there is a definite difference in the health of the gums and teeth when flossing is done properly in conjunction with brushing.” 

Ms. Hartranft continues, “Many dental hygienists and dentists agree that flossing is not the only way to remove plaque. Other aids include interproximal brushes, water flossers, air flossers, interdental sticks and end tufted brushes. I continue to strongly recommend the importance of removing plaque between teeth to our patients, whether through flossing or other interdental aids.”

Registered dental hygienist, Dolly Kituskie, suggests that patients brush at least twice daily, in the morning and evening. She goes on to recommend replacing the toothbrush every 3 to 4 months.  Using a soft toothbrush is advisable.  Things like floss, mouthrinse, interdental cleaners and tongue scrapers help to reduce plaque and control malodor.  The teeth and oral cavity should be checked by your dentist at least twice yearly. People with periodontal disease or those who are prone to cavities, should see their dental hygienist three to four times a year.

An individualized home care regimen should be developed by the oral hygienist and patient.  A dental cleaning should include oral hygiene instruction to ensure that the patient is using the correct technique.  Routine dental checkups help the patient determine that their home care regimen is sufficient to maintain their dental health.

Please feel free to call us at 215-646-6334 or contact us via the web, if you are due for oral hygiene or have a question.

 

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Tags: Dental Hygienist, oral hygiene, teeth, periodontal disease, toothbrushes

Prosthodontist Dr. Balshi Earns Dan Gordon Lifetime Achievement Award

Posted by Chris Raines on Jul 29, 2016 1:12:11 PM

Dr Balshi awarded Dan Gordon Lifetime Achievement AwardDr. Thomas Balshi will receive the Dan Gordon Lifetime Achievement Award from the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) this October at the ACP Annual Session in San Diego. 

Dr. Balshi describes the Dan Gordon Award, “It is given for lifetime achievement in the specialty of Prosthodontics, reflecting on the patient care, research, teaching, and development of new concepts and for participation in the growth of the field of prosthodontics.”

The Dan Gordon Lifetime Achievement award is presented to ACP members who have significantly contributed to the welfare and advancement of the College and to the field of Prosthodontics including outstanding contributions to dentistry, exceptional service to the college, and advancements to the sciences and health professions. The award recognizes the lifetime achievement of members who have provided education to the public about new treatment modalities and provided innovative specialty education in prosthodontic resident programs.

Prosthodontics is a dental specialty recognized by the American Dental Association. Prosthodontists are dentists with advanced training in esthetic restoration and replacement of teeth including two to three years of additional training in an ADA-accredited prosthodontic graduate program. They are experts in restoring missing and compromised teeth with veneers, dental implants, crowns, bridges, dentures and treating problems of the jaw. Their skills range from partial tooth restoration to full mouth reconstruction. These dental specialists are experts in digital dentistry and CAD/CAM dental implant treatment.

Dr. Thomas Balshiis a board certified prosthodontist with over forty years of experience in education, research and clinical expertise.  His worldwide roster of lectures and his abundant publication of research serve to underscore his innovative prosthodontic skill.  Dr. Balshi would define himself by his passion for dental implant achievements leading to two trademarked protocols, Teeth in a Day® and No BoneZ Solution™. His most prized professional milestones are his honorary PhD in science from Cabrini College (2010), his United States Army Medal of Commendation, and the Freedom’s Foundation George Washington Medal of Honor and in 2014, Dr. Balshi was named to Temple University’s Gallery of Success. (View CV)

The American College of Prosthodontists is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of Prosthodontics. Founded in 1970, the ACP is dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of Prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of Prosthodontics to the public, dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of Prosthodontic education and providing professional services to its membership.

A prosthodontist is an excellent choice for your dental care. If you are looking for a dentist specializing in prosthodontics to diagnose and treat you, please feel free to call 215-646-6334 or click below to schedule an appointment.

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Tags: dental implant treatment, American College of Prosthodontics, dental implant research, board certified prosthodontist

July is National Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness Month

Posted by Chris Raines on Jul 18, 2016 5:40:40 PM

July is National Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness MonthJuly is National Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness and Prevention Month and Pi Dental Center is educating the public about these birth defects.

Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when a baby’s lip or mouth do not form properly during pregnancy.

Cleft Lip:

The lips form between the fourth and seventh weeks of pregnancy. Body tissue and special cells from each side of the head grow toward the center of the face and join together to make the face, as the baby develops during pregnancy, forming the facial features. If the tissue that makes up the lip does not join completely before birth, a cleft lip occurs, resulting in an opening in the upper lip. This opening can be a small slit or a large opening that goes through the lip into the nose. A cleft lip can be on one or both sides of the lip, or in rare cases, the middle of the lip. Children with a cleft lip also can have a cleft palate.

Cleft Palate:

Between the sixth and ninth weeks of pregnancy, the roof of the mouth is formed. A cleft palate occurs if the tissue that makes up the roof of the mouth does not join together completely during pregnancy. In some babies, both the front and back parts of the palate are open. For others, only part of the palate is open.

Cleft lips and palates can cause problems with feeding and speaking clearly. Dental problems, frequent ear infections, and hearing problems are also common.

The fourth most common birth defect in the U.S., cleft lips affect one in 700 babies annually. Clefts occur more often in children of Asian, Latino, or Native American descent. Twice as many boys than girls have a cleft lip. But, twice as many girls have cleft palate without a cleft lip.

While most scientists believe clefts are due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors, the actual cause of orofacial clefts is unknown. The CDC recently reported findings from research studies about factors that increase the chance of having a baby with these birth defects. They include women who smoke during pregnancy, women who have been diagnosed with diabetes prior to pregnancy, and women who used certain medicines to treat epilepsy during the first three months of pregnancy, such as  topiramate or valproic acid. Other medications that can increase risk include anti-seizure/anticonvulsant drugs, acne drugs containing Accutane, and methotrexate, a drug commonly used for treating cancer, arthritis, and psoriasis.

The prosthodontists at Pi Dental Center recommend a coordinated approach to care for patients with orofacial clefts by a team that consists of experienced dental professionals, qualified physicians and health care providers from several different specialties.  


Here are some of the specialists that the team includes:

  • a plastic surgeon
  • a prosthodontist
  • an oral-maxillofacial surgeon
  • a craniofacial surgeon
  • a neurosurgeon
  • a pediatric dentist
  • an orthodontist
  • a speech-language pathologist
  • an audiologist
  • a geneticist
  • a pediatrician
  • a psychologist, social worker or other mental health specialist
  • an ophthalmologist 

Prosthodontists are part of the team that helps cleft palate patients. Prosthodontics is a dental specialty recognized by the American Dental Association. A prosthodontist is a dentist who specializes in the esthetic restoration and replacement of teeth and has completed dental school plus three additional years of advanced training and education in an ADA-accredited prosthodontic graduate program. A prosthodontist is the best specialist to choose to make a dental prosthesis. 

Infant with cleft lip and cleft palateBoth of Pi Dental Center’s Board Certified Prosthodontists, Dr. Thomas Balshi and Dr. Glenn Wolfinger treat cleft defect patients. Dr. Balshi states, “We cater to adolescents and adults who have had the cleft surgically repaired. If they have not had it repaired, we can refer them to a number of good plastic surgeons who work with us.”

“Once the soft tissue is closed surgically and the lip heals, we can take care of the dental component using various forms of prosthodontics. Orthodontic treatment may also be needed, since most cleft palates are missing a tooth in the area of the cleft, and the palate collapses inward reducing the diameter of the arch form.”

A maxillary obturator is one type of prostheses produced at Pi Dental Center that is commonly used for patients with cleft defects. At Pi Dental Center, doctors also replace congenitally missing teeth with dental implants, design prostheses and provide ongoing complex treatment as patients grow into adulthood.

Three of the leading organizations that raise awareness for cleft lip and cleft palate conditions include The American Cleft Palate Craniofacial Association (ACPA), the Cleft Palate Foundation and Smile Train.

ACPA is an international non-profit medical society of health care professionals who treat patients and perform research on oral cleft and craniofacial conditions in children and adults with cleft lip, cleft palate, and craniofacial anomalies. Read More: http://www.acpa-cpf.org/

The Cleft Palate Foundation (CPF) serves individuals and families affected by cleft lip, cleft palate and other craniofacial conditions by team coordination, education, and patient support.  CPF, founded in 1973, benefits millions of children in developing countries who live with untreated clefts. Cleft repair surgery is simple and the transformation is immediate. Their sustainable model provides training, funding and resources to empower local doctors in over 85 developing countries to provide free cleft repair surgery and comprehensive cleft care in their own community’s public service arm of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. http://www.cleftline.org/

Smile Train is an international children’s charity that helps millions of children in developing countries who have untreated clefts by providing training, funding and resources empowering local doctors in more than eighty-five developing countries to provide free cleft repair surgery and comprehensive cleft treatment. http://smiltrain.org

If you know someone who is struggling with the dilemma of choosing specialists to treat cleft defects, feel free to contact Pi Dental Center.

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Terminology:

Palatal Obturator – A palatal obturator is a prosthesis that can be used to close defects such as an opening in the roof of the mouth. They are similar to dental retainers. Openings in the hard and soft palate may affect speech or cause nasal regurgitation during feeding. A palatal obturator can improve speech, proper air flow, eating, reduce regurgitation. People who use palatal obturators must be monitored regularly by their prosthodontist to insure continued effectiveness and comfort of the prosthesis.

Palate - The roof of the mouth

For More Information About Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate and Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness Month:

CDC – Cleft Palate Information: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/cleftlip.html

Web MD –Information: http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/cleft-lip-cleft-palate

Resources by Location: http://www.cleftline.org/parents-individuals/team-care/state-listings-p/

Information about Choosing a Cleft Palate or Craniofacial Team: http://www.cleftline.org/docs/PDF_Factsheets/Choosing_Team.pdf

Cleidocranial Dysplasia And Dental Health: http://dentalimplants-usa.com/cleidocranial-dysplasia-and-dental-health/

Pi Dental Center Stories:

Monique’s Story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMg0RTmpsAA

Patient photos of Monique who was born with a cleft lip and palate:
http://dentalimplants-usa.com/patients/gallery/12a05d7basicgallery.html

Tags: board certified prosthodontist, Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness Month

What Are Mini Implants? Jeopardy Question, Jeopardy Answers

Posted by Joanne Balshi, Director of Public Relations on Jul 11, 2016 2:15:03 PM

mini dental implants

Most seekers of dental implant information ask this question. Just exactly what are mini-implants and how are they different from the standard?  Mini-implants have filtered into the lingo of dental solutions, but as their name indicates, they are less invasive, less costly but also less likely to support a long term smile solution.

Principles of engineering naturally dictate that anything requiring support has the best possible anchor.  Since the purpose of the dental implant is to take the place of the root of a natural tooth, the stronger the implant, the more stable and enduring the restoration built upon it will be.

Mini-implants are usually less than 2.5 mm in diameter.  Biomedical engineers suggest that a dental implant be at least 3.75mm in diameter in order to support the forces of biting and chewing.  Pi Dental Center has a long history of success using Nobel Biocare Brånemark Implants starting at 7mm in length and having diameters of 3.75 to 4.0 mm.  Our board certified prosthodontists do not recommend mini-implants for any application.

The mission of the Pi Dental Center has always been to provide the very best possible treatment plan for every patient.  We understand that maintaining a healthy and sparkling smile can sometimes be a costly investment and we feel we respect our patients’ resources best when we offer what most predictably will have significant longevity.

Many Pi dental implant patients sport a prosthetic smile that is beyond twenty years old.  With good oral hygiene at home and regular check-ups, most patients can reap the benefits of their investment for a lifetime with minimal additional financial outlay.  While mini-implants may have the appeal of a less expensive quick fix, they are unlikely to remain a satisfactory support system over the long term.

By Joanne Balshi
Director of Public Relations and Marketing
At Pi Dental Center, Fort Washington, PA
piteam@pidentalcenter.com

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In addition:
mini-implant-graphic-toothpick-table.jpg

The main goal of implant placement is to provide strong solid support for non-removable teeth. One of the most important factors in determining a patient's candidacy for implant placement is bone quantity. The more bone a patient has in the area of implant placement, the better the chance of success. An implant replicates the function of the root of a tooth. When a root resorbs, or shrinks, it cannot support the tooth, and the tooth becomes loose and requires extraction. To achieve the best support for an implant-supported prosthesis, the largest implant that will fit into the area is used. A carpenter would not use toothpicks to support a table. Obviously that the table would eventually collapse! Using mini implants to support a dental prosthesis is similar to using toothpicks to support a table. The normal activities of the mouth such as chewing require an enormous amount of force.

 

Tags: dental implants, osseointegration, osseointegrated dental implants, mini dental implants, dental implant size

The Slippery Slope of Dental Bone Loss

Posted by Chris Raines on Jun 22, 2016 2:45:15 PM

Illustration of Destruction of a Home from Beach ErosionErosion of the earth and dental bone loss in the human mouth share some similarities.  Both are devastatingly damaging; both are financially costly; and both have similar solutions.

We have all seen images of hillside homes toppling from cliffs in California and heard about the destruction of beaches at the New Jersey shore.  Erosion has frequently been reported in the news.  Watch Dramatic Video Showing Effects of Erosion

Erosion of the Earth:

The word erosion comes from the Latin word "erosionem" which means "a gnawing away."  Erosion is the process by which the surface of the earth gets worn down. There are many different forces in nature that cause erosion. The three main forces that cause erosion are water, wind, and ice.

Water is the main cause of erosion and is one of the most powerful forces on the planet. Rainfall can cause erosion both when the rain hits a surface, called splash erosion, and when raindrops accumulate and flow like small streams. Rivers can create a significant amount of erosion over time. They break up particles along the river bottom and carry them downstream. Ocean waves can cause the coastline to erode. The shear energy and force of the waves causes pieces of rock and coastline to break off changing the coastline over time. Large floods can cause erosion to happen very quickly acting like powerful rivers. Beach erosion occurs when waves and currents remove sand from the beach system. The loss of sand causes the beach to become narrower and lower in elevation. Storm waves carry the sand offshore, depositing and storing the sediment in large sandbars.

An eroded stream bankA Solution to Soil Erosion:

One way to limit erosion is by planting trees and vegetation. Watch this YouTube Video demonstrating how erosion occurs and how the process is reduced when plants are present. (https://youtu.be/im4HVXMGI68). Notice that roots keep the water from eroding the soil by holding it in place. The deeper the roots reach into the soil, the more effectively they reduce erosion.

Dental Bone Loss:no-bone-solution.jpg

Periodontal diseases are infections of the structures around the teeth, including the gums, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. A healthy mouth includes bones and teeth surrounded snugly by connective and gum tissue. In the case of periodontitis, bacteria gradually eat away at the underlying jawbone and at the periodontal ligaments that connect tooth to bone.

Bone loss occurs when lost teeth are not replaced. The jawbone melts away with removable dentures or no teeth at all. In the first year after tooth extraction a whopping 25% of bone is lost, and this bone loss continues as each year passes.

Replacing teeth with removable dentures doesn’t solve the problem of bone loss. This is because dentures exert less than 10% of the chewing pressure on bone compared to that of natural teeth. People who wear removable dentures can experience another severe consequence of bone loss: collapse of the lower third of their face.

Removal of the molars in the upper jaw can cause additional resorption of the bone due to expansion of the sinus cavity. With no teeth in place, the air pressure in the sinus cavity causes resorption of the bone lining the sinuses.

A Solution to Bone Loss:Illustration of the similarities between a natural tooth and a dental implant

A proactive approach can help to ensure a healthy mouth.  “Preventing bone loss with good oral hygiene and follow-up is more ideal than trying to rebuild the defective site,” states Dr. Glenn Wolfinger, a board certified prosthodontist at Pi Dental Center.

Bone loss can be prevented by replacing a tooth with a dental implant because an implant acts like a natural tooth root exerting similar pressure as real teeth. An implant can be placed during the same surgical procedure as the tooth extraction.  By replacing single teeth with dental implants or by using a fixed implant-supported bridge, bone loss is minimized.

A single-tooth implant, or a dental bridge supported by dental implants, provides a chewing power that can exceed the bite force of natural teeth.  A prosthesis, secured with dental implants, such as our Teeth In A Day® procedure, provides significant biting force and helps considerably in preventing bone loss.Illustration of facial collapse due to bone loss and restoration of facial proportion following dental implant treatment

While maintaining our beaches, streams and properties supports a healthy Earth, preserving bone in the jaw helps to preserve a healthy mouth and maintains a healthy appearance.

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Terminology:

Alveolar Bone: The bone of the upper jaw or lower jaw that surrounds and supports the teeth.

Dental Implant: Dental implants are replacements for your natural teeth. Natural teeth are connected to biologic roots inside the gum and bone tissue. When they become decayed or compromised and unable to function properly, the best solution is recreating teeth that most closely resemble nature. Dental implants are synthetic roots. The scientifically proven ones are made from titanium, a substance that is compatible with bone tissue and in just a few months’ time, bone actually bonds to the titanium surface of the implant. They become the sub-structure for a whole new set of non-removable teeth.

Edentulous: Without teeth. Patients may be described as fully edentulous when they are missing all their teeth, or partially edentulous when they are missing some of their teeth.

Bone Resorption: Resorption is the process or action by which something is lost or taken away. Bone resorption is a process by which areas of bone structure are lost due to activation of the body's innate capacity to remove mineralized tissue, as mediated via cells such as osteoclasts.

One More Cool Video:

Erosion Video with Bill Nye the Science Guy:    https://youtu.be/J-ULcVdeqgE

View Scientific Articles about Bone Loss, Dental Implants, and More.

 

Tags: dental implants, No Bone Solution, bone loss, maxillofacial prosthodontics, periodontics

Sink Your Teeth Into This One! Pi Dental Center is Serving “the Capital Smile”

Posted by Joanne Balshi, Director of Public Relations on May 23, 2016 2:25:01 PM

Sink your teeth into a sumptuous steak dinner (Photo from Bridget's Steakhouse)

After thirty years courting revolutionary exploration of prosthodontic possibilities, The Pi Dental Center is proud to announce another new concept in smile building. Because we can now engineer superior durability with no sacrifice to translucent, natural esthetics, we are naming the ultimate Pi dental restoration our “Capital Smile.”

The name comes from the complaint most often brought to the Pi Dental Center — “I can’t eat anything that tastes good.”  Taking that to the highest level solution, it is our goal that our patients can enjoy the most sumptuous premium steaks at establishments like The Capital Grille with no worries.  No pain. No motion.  No chewing issues.  No breakage.  Just pure dining pleasure.

Capital GrilleThe specialty of Prosthodontics has been impacted over the years with ever changing science and technology leading to a man-made third set of teeth.  The first giant steps were cosmetic. Laboratories developed artistic ways to shape and color teeth so that crowns and veneers no longer appeared horsey, and in the hands of a skillful clinician became indistinguishable from natural teeth.  Later the advent of dental implant restorations with CADCAM technology made the architecture of the smile more solid and functional, promoting longevity of the restoration prosthesis.  Seemingly the profession was on the threshold of the ideal smile, even if a bit costly for the average pocket.

Halfway through 2016, it’s an intensely blended dedication of engineering, product development, cosmetic experience, fresh ideas and collaboration with the worldwide expertise of Global Dental Science, Inc., headquartered in Scottsdale, Arizona, creator of AvaDent digital removable dentures. Pi has always been about providing our patients the highest quality in the shortest time possible with consideration of the investment. The “Capital Smile” will upgrade technology, increase durability and longevity, and become a more cost effective way to sport a young, healthy smile.

Look for it first at Pi Dental Center, home of Teeth in a Day dental implants. Consider dental implant treatment so that you can sink your teeth

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* Photo of steak dinner graciously submitted by Brian Forrest

Tags: tooth replacement, dental implants, removable dentures, dental health, teeth, Teeth In A Day, sink your teeth

Oral Cancer Screenings at Pi Dental Center

Posted by Chris Raines on May 5, 2016 12:04:06 PM

Oral Cancer Awareness and Oral Cancer Screenings at Pi Dental Center

April was Oral Cancer Awareness Month. Pi Dental Center began a campaign to bring attention to Oral Cancer and to increase early cancer screenings. This campaign is called, “5 Minutes is all it Takes,” and will continue throughout the month of May.

Oral Cancer can occur in any part of the mouth; including the surface of the tongue, inside the cheek, in the lips, gums, roof and floor of the mouth, tonsils and the salivary glands.

FACTS:

  • In 2016 nearly 48,250 people will be diagnosed with Oral or Pharyngeal Cancer in the US.
  • Oral Cancer will cause more than 9,575 deaths.
  • Fifty-seven percent of those diagnosed will survive less than five years.
  • Survival rates have only improved slightly in the past 10 years.
  • The rate of Oral Cancer is higher and has a higher death rate than cervical cancer, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Laryngeal Cancer, Cancer of the Testes, and Endocrine System Cancers.
  • Cancer of the Larynx causes 3,925 deaths per year in the US.
  • Mouth Cancer can affect people of all ages

Men have 50 percent higher risk of developing Oral Cancer as women and this risk increases for men over the age of 50, according to the American Cancer Society. A definitive link exists between the use of tobacco products and the development of Oral Cancer. One study conducted at the University of California, San Francisco, found that more than eight out of ten Oral Cancer patients were smokers. Besides smoking, risk factors for the development of Oral Cancer include the use of smokeless tobacco, such as dip, snuff, or chewing tobacco products. People who use smokeless tobacco products are 50 times more likely to develop cancers of the cheek, gums, and lining of the lips. Excessive consumption of alcohol increases the risk of Oral Cancer. Other factors include a family history of cancer, excessive exposure to the sun and human papillomavirus (HPV). Over 25 percent of Oral Cancers occur in people who do not smoke and who only drink alcohol occasionally.

Registered Dental Hygienist, JuliaRegistered Dental Hygienist at Pi Dental Center, Julia Solomon, has been working at Pi Dental Center for over 20 years. She says, “Don’t smoke and get an annual cancer screening by a dentist.” 

Symptoms of Mouth Cancer can include; red or white patches on the lining of the mouth or tongue, mouth ulcers and swelling, lump and thickening of the lining of the mouth, pain when swallowing, jaw pain and stiffness, sore throat, neck pain, painful tongue and a hoarse voice.  If you experience unusual and unexplained symptoms, please call us at 215-646-6334 as soon as possible to schedule an evaluation.

Glenn Wolfinger, DMD, Board Certified Prosthodontist at Pi Dental CenterIn some cases, Oral Cancer shows no symptoms. This is why having regular Oral Cancer screenings is so important. Dr. Glenn Wolfinger states, “One of the important things to understand is that all patients, even denture patients, can get Oral Cancer. Although patients may not have natural teeth, and may not have scheduled oral hygiene cleaning visits, denture patients should come in yearly for an Oral Cancer screening and examination.”

Early detection is the key to survival! Dr. Wolfinger asserts, “A lot of lesions can be detected early.  Prognosis is much better with early detection.” When detected early, successful treatment rates range from 80 to 90 percent. This number drops significantly when Oral Cancer is discovered later.

Oral Cancer screening is an important part of every new patient diagnostic evaluation and every oral hygiene maintenance appointment performed at Pi Dental Center. This routine procedure saves lives!

Pi Dental Center is committed to improving the chances of survival for people with Oral Cancer. For each patient who schedules oral hygiene with cancer screening, through this campaign, Pi Dental Center will donate to the Oral Cancer Foundation.  Please call us if you have questions or concerns and to schedule your Oral Cancer screening appointment.

Request an appointment at Pi Dental Center

Read more about the link between Oral Cancer and Tobacco, smoking and Oral Cancer, Dental Examination and Oral Cancer Screening:

http://oralcancerfoundation.org
http://oralcancerfoundation.org/tobacco
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/165331.php
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/oral-cancer

 

Tags: oral hygiene cleaning, link between Oral Cancer and tobacco, oral cancer screening, smoking and Oral Cancer, oral cancer awareness, dental examination and oral cancer screening

The Strength Of A Lion’s Bite

Posted by Chris Raines on Apr 25, 2016 3:16:52 PM

A Lion Without His Bite Is Not Really A Lion

Aslan is a rare 10-year old white lion living in a wildlife preserve in South Africa

Aslan is a rare 10 year-old male white lion that lives at the Kevin Richardson Wildlife Sanctuary in South Africa.  When Aslan broke his canines a few years ago, his personality changed; he became like a different cat. Aslan was more agitated and more aggressive. He isolated himself from the pride.

Kevin Richardson, lion whisperer and animal behaviorist states, “A lion without its bite is not really a lion, it’s really important for a lion to have a full set of teeth that are usable.” Fixodent enabled a complex and risky 4-hour surgery to be performed on Aslan, to repair the damaged teeth, and they produced a fascinating video telling the lion's story about his dental journey.

Link to Video Telling The Story Of Aslan The White Lion

View Video About Aslan On Omeleto on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/omeletocom/videos/10154116130789494/?pnref=story

Aslan's, surgery was completed on-site at the sanctuary and lasted almost six hours.  Once Aslan's teeth were repaired and his pain was gone, he was a more secure, happier lion.  Soon he was able to be successfully reintroduced back into his pride. Within a short period of time, the lions were all lying together contentedly. As Mr. Richardson affirmed, "The king is back!"

Aslan's reaction to his dental pain was just like what people experience. "Dental pain is a chronic...debilitating pain," states Dr. Gerhard Steenkamp, Animal Dentist, "It's a pain that you don't want to do things, you're just thinking of the tooth all the time." Tooth pain stops people from doing what they want to do. It holds them down and prevents them from accomplishing their goals. It controls their lives and results in a poor quality of life. Dental pain can also have a negative impact on family relations.

Many people tend to compartmentalize their dental health. When they have a physical problem, they readily seek treatment, but these same people will endure persistent tooth pain for ages. They view the mouth as separate from the rest of the body. The question to ask them is, 'How is this affecting the rest of your life?' Chronic tooth pain can disrupt sleep, diminish the ability to learn and affect nutrition. Imagine the possibilities for a better life, if tooth pain was eliminated!

Are you someone who has been enduring tooth pain? Or do you know someone who is living with tooth pain? Perhaps it is time to find an answer.

Understanding your best options for treatment can feel overwhelming. A visit to Pi Dental Center will help you to understand your choices and move forward.

Pi Dental Center is unlike other dental centers, providing unsurpassed dental care and expertise with two renowned board certified prosthodontists, ongoing research, a skilled and experienced teamand state-of-the-art clinical facility. Exceptional and consistent patient care is Pi Dental Center’s top priority ensuring the best care for each patient.

Visit Pi Dental Center to restore your mouth with functional, comfortable and attractive teeth, renew your energy and revitalize your life, so that you can say, "The King is Back!"

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Tags: dental surgery, dental pain, dental and medical health, dental medical health connection, oral health and quality of life, dental health and quality of life

Open House Draws Celebrity to Fort Washington

Posted by Joanne Balshi, Director of Public Relations on Apr 8, 2016 9:00:00 AM

National Prosthodontics Awareness Week is celebrated by Drs. Balshi, Wolfinger, Pi Team and rich Zeoli with the WPHT Radio Staff

As part of Pi Dental Center’s week long celebration of National Prosthodontics Awareness Week, WPHT radio personality, Rich Zeoli, broadcasted three hour daily show “live” from Pi, followed by a “meet and greet” engagement with the dental center’s visitors and guests.  Zeoli, who frequently endorses Pi’s philosophy of smile care on his network, was the center point of a week long “Open House,” showcasing new prosthodontic technology and providing prospective patients the opportunity to have questions answered without a formal appointment.2015_0405OpenHouse-_9.jpg

2015_0405OpenHouse-_2.jpgTwo board certified prosthodontists, Dr. Tom Balshiand Dr. Glenn Wolfinger lead the Pi facility which is a center for comprehensive clinical care, education and research.  They are known for their trademarked Teeth in a Day streamlined dental implant procedures as well as innovative dental solutions for patients without sufficient bone for traditional implant treatment.  They are also the East Coast “hub” for futuristic AvaDent dentures.

National Prosthodontics Awareness Week raises public awareness about the having a healthy mouth and the importance of maintaining good dental care.

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Tags: dental implants, AvaDent digital dentures, board certified prosthodontist, National Prosthodontics Awareness Week, Teeth In A Day

Dental Implants in Philadelphia Making “Wildcat” Smiles

Posted by Joanne Balshi, Director of Public Relations on Apr 5, 2016 12:59:31 PM

Dental Implants in Philadelphia Making "Wildcat" Fans SmileFor those who are avid fans of the National Champion Villanova Wildcats, and even for those who just like to view an epic basketball game now and then, the 2016 NCAA Men’s Finals concluded with a monumental “shining moment.”  Rarely is a championship decided at the sound of the final buzzer, but for the Villanova Wildcats, a season of remarkable dedication and unselfishness ended in widespread memorable reward.

Today at the Pi Dental Center in Fort Washington, it is a double celebration.  Pi will kick off National Prosthodontics Awareness Week with our first Open House, VIP tours, refreshments, giveaways, celebrities and more. But in addition to celebrating smiles we create in house, we will also be celebrating the Wildcat win…Big Time!  That is because both Pi’s founder, Dr. Tom Balshi and his partner, Dr. Glenn Wolfinger, are graduates of Villanova University…one in 1968 and one 1986.  And neither of them are bandwagon fans.  They are energetic, professed supporters of all Villanova sports and proudly sport the logo attire all over the USA!

The amazing Wildcat win on April 4, 2016 made the Pi team smile exuberantly, but as our Open House will showcase throughout the rest of this week, WE are making smiles that change lives and have remarkable longevity. When our patients gaze in the mirror after a total Teeth in a Day Makeover, they feel the same “rush” that fans felt when Kris Jenkins sunk the final basket that won the game.  It’s all about spirit, skill, satisfaction, confidence, balance, hope, trust, even love. Catch the ball. Feel it in your hands.  Make the appointment and let us coach you to a winning smile.  Everyone has a little bit of “Wildcat” inside them.

Tags: board certified prosthodontist, dental implants Philadelphia, National Prosthodontics Awareness Week