Thomas Balshi, DDS FACP

Dr. Thomas J. Balshi is a Board Certified Prosthodontist and the Founder of The Institute For Facial Esthetics in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania. His forty year career in dental medicine includes graduate and post-graduate degrees from Temple University School of Dentistry and prosthetic implant training at both the University of Toronto and The Institute For Applied Biotechnology in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Dr. Balshi is a devoted clinician, avid researcher, and seasoned academician. He has lectured internationally from the Royal Academy of Medicine in London, to world congresses in Paris, Munich, Bologna, Athens, New Delhi, and Sydney, as well as in many cities in both North and South America.

Considered an expert in dental implant prosthodontics, his trademarked Teeth in a Day protocol has served patients from around the globe. He has authored numerous scientific articles published in professional journals as well as co-authored the handbook titled A Patient’s Guide To Dental Implants. He has appeared accomplishing live dental implant surgery on Good Morning America and on NBC’s The Today Show.

Dr. Balshi is a Diplomate of The American Board of Prosthodontics as well as a member of numerous other professional organizations. In addition to his scientific awards, he holds a United States Army Medal of Commendation, a Freedom Foundation George Washington Medal of Honor, and has been recognized in the Congressional Record of the United States of America. He was recently appointed to the advisory board of New Beauty Magazine.

Dr. Balshi received a Citation of Recognition from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, House of Representatives, and the Freedom Foundation’s George Washington Honor Medal for excellence and individual achievement in the dental field. In 2004, Dr. Balshi was selected to be in the book, “The Best Dentists in America.” Dr. Balshi was voted a TOP DENTIST in Philly Magazine in 2016 and received an Honorary Doctorate from Cabrini College, Radnor, PA. In 2014, Dr. Balshi was honored for 40 continuous years of service to The American College of Prosthodontists.

Dr. Balshi established, Pi Dental Center, one of the first dental implant treatment centers in the United States, utilizing the Brånemark System of osseointegrated implants. The center focuses on advanced clinical treatment, extensive research with osseointegrated dental implants, and private clinical training programs.

Dr. Balshi lectures globally at meetings on the subject of osseointegrated dental implants, and has published landmark articles on the subject. He participates in the Temple University School of Dentistry Continuing Education Program. He has created a video to instruct implant patients on oral hygiene procedures, and has published a comprehensive cookbook entitled FROM SOUP TO NUTS, designed for patients going through implant treatment. Dr. Balshi has taught graduate and postdoctoral students from Harvard, Tufts, and many other dental schools, the protocols developed at PI for TEETH IN A DAY and TEETH IN AN HOUR. He has also appeared on numerous national television programs, explaining the value of permanent teeth supported by dental implants, and he has directed the PI Team in the production of several patient information videos, including A WHOLE NEW WORLD, and PREDICTABLE MIRACLES.
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Dr. Thomas Balshi Discusses Dental Implants on WNWR 1540 AM RADIO

Posted by Thomas Balshi, DDS FACP on May 26, 2011 12:38:00 PM

 

Dr. Thomas BalshiDr. Thomas Balshi will be interviewed by Marina Kats on her Russian radio show on WNWR Radio at 1540 (AM) this afternoon, May 26, 2011 from 4pm to 5pm.  The program will broadcast in the Russian language.


Dr. Thomas J. Balshi is a Board Certified Prosthodontist and the Founder of Pi Dental Center at The Institute For Facial Esthetics in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania.  His forty year career in dental medicine includes graduate and post-graduate degrees from Temple University School of Dentistry and prosthetic implant training at both the University of Toronto and The Institute For Applied Biotechnology in Gothenburg, Sweden. 

Dr. Balshi established Pi Dental Center, one of the first dental implant treatment centers in the United States, utilizing the Brånemark System of osseointegrated implants. The center focuses on advanced clinical treatment, extensive research with osseointegrated dental implants, and private clinical training programs.    

WNWR 1540 AM Radio
WNWR broadcasts to diverse ethnic and international communities throughout the Delaware Valley region in English and other languages. They reach a 60-mile radius of Philadelphia with a powerful 50,000 watt regional signal at 1540 kHz (AM).
 
Marina KatsMarina Kats was born and raised in Kiev, Ukraine and moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1979. Ms. Kats graduated from Temple University, Beasley School of Law with a Masters Degree, becoming one of a handful of women nationally to receive the LLM. in trial advocacy. Ms. Kats is on Temple University School of Law Alumni Board and also founder of the law firm of Kats, van der Veen & Associates.  Ms. Kats co-hosts a weekly radio show on New World radio. For her many successes in business and law, Ms. Kats was elected “One of the 50 Best Business Women in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania" by the Governor in 1997. Ms. Kats also was honored as "Woman of the Year" by the Bucks County YMCA and as "Consumer Advocate of the Year" for the past three consecutive years.

 
Dr. Balshi will discuss dental implant treatment including Teeth In A Day and Teeth In An Hour treatment.  Tune into WNWR 1540 (AM) from 4pm to 5pm today to listen to the interview!


Tags: dental implants

What Is the Real Cost of Dentures?

Posted by Thomas Balshi, DDS FACP on May 3, 2011 11:37:00 AM

dentureimageThirty-five million Americans are edentulous.  That means they have no remaining natural teeth.  In the worst of situations these individuals opt to do nothing about it.  For them, the aging process thrusts into high gear.  Bone resorbs causing the face to become cavernous; chewing food becomes a grandiose task; nutrition is a forgotten concept.  Overall systemic health decays and quality of life nosedives.

 
A large majority of the edentulous population elect to purchase dentures. For some this decision is economic as the first set of dentures is likely to cost significantly less than other healthier choices. However, many are lured into this confidence shaking nightmare without sufficient education about the real cost of teeth that come out at night. And the bottom line is that even with the best dentures on earth, a denture wearer is still Removable dentureedentulous. The teeth have essentially been amputated.


 
Cutting edge dentistry has achieved the science of replacing removable teeth with permanent smiles that both look and function like our natural ones.  Titanium dental implants readily fuse to bone in the mouth and through a process called osseointegration, these implants become viable new roots to support permanent prosthetic teeth.  In dental laboratories worldwide, master technicians who are both artists and precision engineers, custom design these man milled teeth to be perfectly suited to every face, shaping and coloring them layer by layer and tooth by tooth. They are not massed produced “chiclets” awaiting the next edentulous person in line to buy them.
 
Dental implant treatment is costly, but considering the number of highly skilled professionals involved in re-creating natural teeth, the value becomes a lifelong, often life-changing investment.  Many individuals with failing health bemoan that money cannot buy quality of life back for them, but in the case of a healthy smile, there are real solutions that are becoming more and more affordable every day.
 
Long term dentures eventually become costly. Because oral bone continues to shrink even with dentures in place, that first set of dentures will begin to loosen like old loafers and develop mobility.  The first fix is more glue in the mouth.  Then the lab will reline the dentures.  Eventually another set will be required. And then another and perhaps another. The skin on the face cannot keep up with the shrinking gumline and wrinkles develop. The facial profile sags.  Enter psychological cost. There is no peace of mind that this deteriorating condition will ever come to conclusion. Consider also that time is money and much precious time may be spent in pursuit of comfortable dentures with an acceptable appearance.
 
Teeth in a Day is state of the art implant care that provides patients with permanent smiles in a single dental visit. Like natural teeth, the implant prosthesis keeps the facial structure vibrantly in place, actively preserving youth.  The teeth have the strength and stability to keep healthy nutrition active for the duration of life. A visit to the dentist becomes a lifelong positive experience—the smile is brightened to brand new time after time after time.  Investment in dental implant care pays premium life dividends.  The cost of dentures is an undetermined endless chasm.
 


Tags: dental implant treatment, smile makeover

Esthetics For Patient With Diagnosis Of "No Bone In The Upper Arch."

Posted by Thomas Balshi, DDS FACP on Apr 19, 2011 1:57:00 PM

Patient Treatment Using The "No Bone Solution" for Dental Implant Treatment

AGAINST ALL ODDS

 Post Treatment Patient Photos

Patient Profile

A 67 year old male was referred to the Pi Dental Center at the Institute for Facial Esthetics with a prior diagnosis of "no bone in the maxilla." His desire for treatment included "fixed teeth" and improved esthetics. The following medical conditions were detrimental to the long-term prognosis of his case, but not insurmountable. He presented with diabetes, emphysema, high blood-pressure, as well as dry mouth. To make matters worse, he smoked 2 packs of cigarettes a day and admitted to an intense parafunctional habit of clenching.

Pre-treatment condition

Clinical Exam

Following a thorough oral examination, which included assessment of the existing prosthetics, diagnostic casts, panorex and AP and lateral cephalometric radiographs.

Treatment Photos

Patient Profile

A 67 year old male was referred to the Pi Dental Center at the Institute for Facial

Esthetics with a prior diagnosis of "no bone in the maxilla." His desire for treatment

included "fixed teeth" and improved esthetics. The following medical conditions were

detrimental to the long-term prognosis of his case, but not insurmountable. He

presented with diabetes, emphysema, high blood-pressure, as well as dry mouth. To

make matters worse, he smoked 2 packs of cigarettes a day and admitted to an

intense parafunctional habit of clenching.

Final Prosthesis

Clinical Exam

Following a thorough oral examination, which included assessment of the existing

prosthetics, diagnostic casts, panorex and AP and lateral cephalometric radiographs

 

Radiographic Study

Following a 20-second cone beam i-Cat scan the DICOM files were converted to 3-

D planning files using the Nobel Biocare Procera software. Evaluation of the bone

volume confirmed the original “no bone maxilla” diagnosis. (Fig. 2) The anterior

maxilla suffered combination syndrome exacerbated by the mandibular anterior

implant supported overdenture. The maxilla at the floor of the nose ranged from 0.5

to 2mm, except for an 8mm island of bone at the midline. The posterior maxilla also

exhibited extreme atrophy with expanded antra bilaterally. The left sinus was

previously grafted with a xenograft in the area of the failing mini implants. The bone

at the floor of the sinus in all other areas was less than 3mm.

 

Clinical Course

The non-integrated mini implants were easily removed by reverse turning.

Five implants were placed using Nobel Biocare's guide protocol. In the anterior, 2 paranasal Brånemark 3.75mm diameter implants and one midline implant were placed. Additionally, 2 pterygoid implants were also placed with the aid of the surgical guide.

Following the guided implant placement, the surgical guide was removed and full thickness flaps elevated to permit a lateral viewing window to be opened in both sinuses. Four Brånemark zygomatic implants were securely placed followed by flap closure and the construction of the screw retained fixed Teeth In A Day® all acrylic interim prosthesis.(Figs. 3 and 4) 

Our illustrations attest that he patient's goals were achieved. Not only did he leave the day of surgery with an implant supported Teeth In A Day® prosthesis, but his esthetics, speech and quality of life were immediately enhanced. 

Tags: dental implants

Prosthodontics Awareness Week a la Pi Dental Center

Posted by Thomas Balshi, DDS FACP on Apr 11, 2011 2:40:00 PM

Prosthodontics Awareness Week a la Pi Dental Center

April 4-9, 2011

Pi Team At Open House

When the American College of Prosthodontists announced their first designation of a Prosthodontics Awareness Week, the Pi team embraced the idea with gusto.  Here was an opportunity to showcase all that distinguishes a prosthodontic practice from a neighborhood dental office. 

Drs. Thomas Balshi and Glenn Wolfinger


We started with a simple question: Do YOU have a prosthodontist?  We threw it out there on the internet, in the local newspapers, and in banks and restaurants and supermarkets.  Then we elected to answer the question comprehensively by opening our doors to the community.

 

The Pi Dental Center invited prospective patients and all of our patient family to Open House.  We provided tours, question and answer sessions, refreshments, and a rolling slide show of dental trivia, before and after photos, and most importantly, bold statements that defined what a prosthodontist really is. Astoundingly one of the most successful parts of the event turned out to be the conversations between treated patients and those contemplating a whole new smile. The articulated enthusiasm and spirit of “go for it” were overwhelming.  Giveaway bags and a raffle rounded out the day.


Andrea Smiles at Pi Dental Center Open House

Throughout the week, silver trays of decorated cookies in the shape of toothbrushes and toothpaste tubes graced our reception area.  In early March our staff were invited to suggest a clever tag line to write on the cookies.  Twenty-five staff actually submitted forty-six entries.  The judges chose:  Prosthodontics is for smart cookies!


Everyone from the mailman to the last patient on Friday afternoon took home a brush and a tube.


So what does make a prosthodontist different?  Besides his superior training (at least two years of specialty education beyond regular dental school), a prosthodontist has extraordinary vision. A prosthodontist blends science and esthetics, engineering and spatial relations to create natural looking teeth, custom designed for each individual patient, that function with precision and radiate health and beauty. Open House Refreshments It does not matter whether it is one single tooth or an entire upper and lower dentition; a prosthodontist’s eye is geared toward perfection.  He/she is not simply maintaining teeth but rather is building or rebuilding one of humanity’s most powerful assets. A prosthodontist has a sense of pride in smiles that is born of passion and education second to none in the dental profession. When one is contemplating the reconstruction of a smile, the prosthodontist is the specialist that will best manage the delivery of care and provide an outcome that will exceed expectations.   Prosthodontics Week 2011

Tags: dentist, Pi Dental Center, restorative dentistry

Does Faking A Smile Make You Feel Bad? New Beauty Magazine Asks Their Experts

Posted by Thomas Balshi, DDS FACP on Mar 29, 2011 11:44:00 AM

New Beauty Magazine

 

NEW BEAUTY’s Internet magazine, DAILY BEAUTY, poses thought provoking questions to their readers. Recently, they sought comments on an article by Brenna Fisher suggesting that faking a smile negatively affects a person’s mood. Dr. Thomas J. Balshi, DDS, FACP and advisor to NEW BEAUTY was among the dental specialists adding his own brush stroke.

Dr. Balshi commentBalshi, a board certified prosthodontist and founder of the Pi Dental Center in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania states: “When one has an exquisite smile to share with the world, using it gives the individual pleasure in every circumstance. In a positive situation it will give greater satisfaction, but even when faked, there is still a modicum of self-worth exhibited by displaying one of humanity’s most underrated assets—a healthy smile. Conversely, when one has a smile that is flawed, each time it is used there could be some emotional discomfort in the display. A hearty laugh could perhaps balance the negative impact of a poor smile, but faking a smile would be a double whammy. We all strive to remove negative impact from everyday life. Teeth in a Day™ dental implant reconstructions make that privileged self-esteem-booster smile available to everyone in a matter of hours.”

A recent Michigan University study found that moods are often low in customer service agents who routinely force smiles and pleasant conversation. These people tend to demonstrate lower job productivity than employees whose smiles emerge from positive thinking.

Among Dr. Balshi's favorite patients is the chief academic officer of a very prestigious hospital. Before his smile reconstruction, he had to work hard at producing a closed mouth grin.  A former boss told him he intimidated people and needed to smile more. Post-operatively, his smile lights up a very welcoming face.
"Your expertise has made me feel better emotionally and physically.  Some men get a Porsche when they have their mid-life crisis.  I got teeth.  After my children's college tuition, this is the best money I have spent."  JCR, M.D, M.Ed., FACS

The smile is a very complex entity, far more intertwined with overall physical and emotional health than we may expect.

Tags: New Beauty Magazine, smile makeover, board certified prosthodontist

Winter 2011 Insights Newsletter Highlights Dental Treatment and Planning

Posted by Thomas Balshi, DDS FACP on Mar 15, 2011 11:55:00 AM

Insights NewsletterThe Importance Of Attention To Detail

To provide consistent high quality restorations, whether for single crowns or full mouth reconstructions, attention to detail is essential from treatment planning to prosthesis delivery. We all know the critical marks of excellence. The oral examination must be thorough and include cancer screening. A written treatment plan is the ideal roadmap for sequencing the indicated treatment. The tooth is prepared allowing sufficient room for the thickness of the restoring material and with particular consideration to the health of the soft tissue response following delivery. Proper height of contour, immergence profile and correct interproximal contours are all details that impact quality care.
Before and After Photos

Once the tooth preparation is finalized, other important steps also require attention to detail. Retraction of gingival tissues is key. Consideration must be given as to whether the tissue is thick or thin and friable. When a retraction cord is used, size and the exertion of pressure placing the cord are both critical. Fibrous connections must never be compromised.

The Final Impression is a Detail of Utmost Importance.

The dental laboratory can only provide the natural looking, perfect crown we are expecting if we provide them with the most exact impression possible. Each practitioner has his or her own techniques, usually based on vast experience, for achieving the ideal impression, but what is often overlooked in this equation is the quality of the impression material being used. This is where attention to detail points to accuracy and provides for a more predictable result.
Before and After Photo

ENTER EXA’lence | this is an impression material that is clearly “new”.

Developed by GC America, EXA’lence combines vinyl and polymer to produce a totally new impression material set apart from all of the others. It is intrinsically hydrophilic without surfactants for wet-ability. It has a high tear strength that allows for easy removal from the mouth and multiple accurate pours for stone casts. In addition, its chemistry minimizes bubbles and voids, resulting in very clean and sharp impressions. The following complete implant prosthodontic rehabilitation was achieved with EXA’lence impression material.

Attention to detail is the hallmark of good dentistry and should be essential in every phase of treatment. We as dentists have autonomous control of our implant placement, our crown preparations, proper vertical dimension and articulation. What we need is to place more importance upon our choices of dental materials.

Dentists who are currently using EXA’lence report that it is both pleasant to use and consistently accurate, allowing for sulcular moisture control and very exacting subgingival and marginal detail. Lab technicians’ report that it both pours easily, allows for second pours if needed, and provides well-defined impressions. In a recent Catapult Evaluation, 81% of the evaluators said they would integrate EXA’lence into their practice. For further information on EXA’lence, please go to gcamerica.com or call 215-646-6334.

THE IMPORTANCE OF ATTENTION TO ORAL SCREENING

With the National Cancer Institute estimating approximately 36 thousand new cases of oral cancer for 2010 and the likelihood that close to 8 thousand will result in death, our responsibilities as dentists significantly increase. Identifying lesions early is the key to preventing fatalities. Oral cancers that present at an advanced stage have a higher death rate than breast cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma or lymphoma.

It is important that the dental profession take seriously our responsibility to identify lesions in the mouth quickly and to educate the patient thoroughly in treatment protocol. We recently presented a case study in which an older Caucasian female received maxillary and mandibular implant-supported prostheses (1992) and subsequent meticulous follow-up had no indications of any soft tissue abnormality. In 2008, the patient presented with a “rough area” on the tongue. A 5x7 mm fibroma-like elevated lesion was noted and attributed to mechanical trauma. Surface adjustments were made and the patient was advised to return for a follow-up appointment in two weeks.

This patient did not return for further evaluation but moved out of state. We requested that she immediately consult a specialist in her new location. Follow-up was then lost.

In 2010, the patient returned to Pi complaining of a sore on her tongue. She had not followed our advice and had not been seen by any dental specialist since her 2008 visit. Examination of the patient revealed an ulcerated mass on the right lateral border of the tongue, which extended onto the ventral and dorsal surfaces. The lesion was hard and irregular. A regional cancer center confirmed squamous cell carcinoma. The patient declined further care and expired a few weeks later.

Cases such as this indicate the importance of regular oral screenings for cancer and meticulous follow-up when suspicious lesions are found. It is equally essential that time be taken to carefully explain to the patient that oral cancer is curable when found early and treated accordingly. Similarly, we must also indicate the seriousness of leaving such findings untreated or approaching them holistically.

Tags: dental implants, dental treatment, dentistry, dental treatment planning