Antibiotics in the Dental Practice

Posted by Pi Dental Center on Dec 17, 2019 11:45:00 AM

Antibiotic resistance is a global health challenge.Antibiotics are medications that inhibit growth and destroy bacteria. These medications have saved countless lives, but are now under scrutiny. Prescribing antibiotics when they are not needed, leads to bacterial resistance and bacterial resistance creates a host of problems. The American Dental Association reported that dentists are the third-highest prescriber of antibiotics in an outpatient setting.

Antibiotic resistance is a global health challenge.

Antibiotic resistance is a global health challenge because it can lead to severe infections, medical complications, longer recovery time, increased hospitalizations, more costly treatment and even death. When a strain of bacteria is no longer affected by an antibiotic, it is considered antibiotic-resistant.

Antibiotics are associated with C. difficile (a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon).

Superbugs are bacteria that have high levels of resistance to a wide range of antibiotics. Superbugs are on the rise.

The Mayo Clinic states that approximately 2 million infections result in 23,000 deaths from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the United States each year.

In a report published in April, The World Health Organization stated that drug-resistant diseases could become the leading cause of death globally by 2050.

Dental pain and swelling are a common complaint for patients who visit the dentist. Dentists have often prescribed antibiotics to relieve dental pain and swelling. The American Dental Association recently published a report providing clinical recommendations advising dentists against prescribing antibiotics for dental pain and swelling. The ADA stated that from 2017 to 2019 between 30% and 85% of dental antibiotic prescriptions may have been unwarranted. An expert panel outlined the benefits and harms associated with antibiotic use. Evidence shows that antibiotics can be harmful when used unnecessarily. The panel advised using antibiotics only when systemic involvement is present.

Some of the reasons antibiotics are overused:

  • Patients pressure their doctor to receive prescriptions for antibiotics
  • Patients self-diagnosing and purchasing antibiotics online
  • Patients taking antibiotics left over from a previous illness

Doctors, dentists and patients must all help to ensure that medications are used properly. It is our goal at Pi Dental Center to prescribe wisely. When possible, the doctors at Pi Dental Center recommend over-the-counter pain relievers. Antibiotics are used only when necessary.

Tips for controlling antibiotic use:

  • Let mild illnesses run their course.
  • Refrain from pressuring your dentist for an antibiotic prescription.
  • Take all antibiotics as prescribed.
  • Do not take antibiotics longer than prescribed.
  • Never use left-over antibiotics.
  • Do not take antibiotics that have been prescribed for someone else.
  • Practice good oral hygiene to avoid serious dental problems.

Talk to your dentist about any concerns that you have about your care and what medication is needed. Give us a call if you need additional information or would like to schedule an appointment.

Ask A Dental Question Or Schedule An Appointment

Responsible Antibiotic Usage Sources:

Evidence-based clinical practice guideline on antibiotic use for the urgent management of pulpal- and periapical-related dental pain and intraoral swelling, A report from the American Dental Association, ADA News – November 2019

Antimicrobial resistance: risk associated with antibiotic overuse and initiatives to reduce the problem.  Sage Journals: Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety

Antibiotics not needed to manage most pulpal-related dental pain, ADA guideline advises. November 06, 2019 Oral Health California Dental Association.

Overuse and overprescribing of antibiotics. University of Minnesota – CIDRAP. http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/asp/overuse-overprescribing-of-antibiotics

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC: 1 in 3 antibiotic prescriptions unnecessary. May 3, 2016.

Antibiotics: misuse puts you and others at risk. Mayo Clinic. Dec 12, 2014.

Related Subject: Premedication

Tags: Medical and Dental Health, preventative dentistry, antibiotics in dentistry, Antibiotic resistance

Dr. Slauch’s First 100 Days At Pi In Implant Prosthodontics

Posted by Pi Dental Center on Nov 16, 2019 12:00:00 PM

Dr. Robert Slauch, Board Certified Prosthodontist, at Pi Dental CenterIt has been 100 days since Dr. Robert Slauch joined Pi Dental Center as a prosthodontist. In this blog, Dr. Slauch talks about his dental school experience, working as a prosthodontist during the past three months and about his board certification.

What made you choose Pi Dental Center?

Pi Dental Center and I have a close history dating back to 2012. When I was deciding if a career in dentistry is what I wanted to pursue, Drs. Tom Balshi and Glenn Wolfinger allowed me to intern at the practice and learn about prosthodontics. Their guidance helped me fall in love with the dental profession and pursue a career in it. As I was completing my prosthodontics residency at University of Connecticut, Pi approached me and asked if I wanted to join the practice. I was delighted at the opportunity to return to the Philadelphia area as well as begin my professional career in the practice that made me fall in love with the profession.

How did you prepare to work at Pi Dental Center?

The process of becoming a prosthodontist is a rigorous one: 4 years of undergrad education, 4 years of dental school and finally 3 years of prosthodontics specialty training. It is in residency where you are trained in all the complex aspects of prosthodontics including diagnosis, treatment planning, and the surgical and restorative aspects of care.

What have you learned at Pi Dental Center?

I am learning a lot about the surgical protocols that Pi Dental Center has created and implemented over the past 32 years. Dr. Wolfinger and Dr. Balshi have introduced me to aspects of prosthodontics that will make a great contribution to patient care.

What are some highlights of your first 100 days?

Private practice is a lot different than residency! It’s great to have the clinical and administrative support around you to be able to focus on patient care. I have learned a lot from having great mentors like Dr. Wolfinger and Dr. Balshi, who have been in practice for over 60 years combined!

Is anything different than you expected?

Given the fact that I have had a close relationship with Pi Dental since 2012, I had a strong idea what working here would be like. I believe the transition for myself and everyone at the practice was a seamless one. Everything has been what I have expected.

What are your goals for your patients, the center and yourself?

My goal is to help patients achieve their esthetic and functional desires for their teeth and smile. Some of these cases require a lot of planning and communication and I love working with patients, as a team to achieve the results they expect. I look forward to helping Pi Dental Center maintain a strong hold in the area as a respected dental practice. As I begin my career in private practice, I look forward to making my patients happy with the prosthodontic services I provide as well as be a leader and advocate for the specialty of prosthodontics.

Please discuss your contributions and accomplishments.

I have been fortunate enough to have obtained board certification by the American Board of Prosthodontics. In addition, my research in implant prosthodontics has received national recognition by the American College of Prosthodontists and the Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics.

What has been your most meaningful experience?

So far, the most meaningful experience has been learning from great mentors in residency and private practice. Also having an in-house laboratory technician and ceramist has provided me the ability to learn their workflows and make the patient experience that much better.

What has been the most rewarding?

The most rewarding thing is being able to come to work and love what you do. Also, to work with the great clinical assistants and administrative staff here at Pi Dental.

What relationships have you built?

Building relationships with the patients is the best. I want them to have a sense of trust in me when they come to the practice. We help patients navigate through life-changing dental experiences that have a long-lasting impact.

In terms of patients’ oral health, what is some key dental health information that you would like them to understand?

Dental patients need to understand that lifelong maintenance is the key to protecting the investment in their smiles.

Seeing your dentist every four to six months is crucial. Don’t think that since you’ve gotten expensive restorative work done on your teeth, that you are immune to future potential complications. PREVENTATIVE DENTISTRY is still the key to maintaining your dental health!

If you are looking for a new dentist or need dental care such as dental implants or well-crafted replacement teeth, Dr. Slauch and the Pi Dental Center team can help.

Ask A Dental Question Or Schedule An Appointment

Tags: board certified prosthodontist, American Board of Prosthodontics, implant prosthodontics, preventative dentistry